Monday, November 21, 2016

Pack your bags......

Pack your bags.
Pack your car.
Pack your sleigh.
But don’t let your pet pack on the holiday pounds.


Holiday season is upon us — a busy time of year for festivities, family and of course, lots of eating! Did you know that if a ten-pound cat ate just one ounce of cheddar cheese from your hors d’oeuvres, it would be the same as if a person ate three and a half hamburgers or four chocolate bars? Gaining those “holiday pounds” is not just a problem for humans, but also for our four-legged friends.

Research shows that pets are more likely to gain unwanted pounds during this holiday period than any other time of year. What pet can resist a potato chip, onion dip or chocolate? (Wait, you know better than to feed them that!)  

Obesity is the leading medical problem in pets. When a pet is too chubby, not only may they have little energy to walk or play, but also studies have shown that pets who are overweight may have a shortened life span.

How can you tell if your pet is at the right weight?

It can be hard to know because for many pets, they don’t get a big round belly. Instead, the extra fat is well hidden inside your pet’s body, tucked between their vital organs. So let us check! Our veterinary practice team has a trained eye to best assess your pet’s weight. Bring your pet in for their yearly exam and we’ll take a look at their body condition and nutritional needs. If we determine your pet needs to lose a few pounds, don’t worry. We’ll come up with a plan that will keep you and your pet sailing through the holiday season.




Call White House Animal Hospital today to schedule your pet’s yearly checkup. Happy holidays and remember, pack your suitcase. Pack a trunk. It’s even fine to pack a sleigh. But don’t let your pet pack on the pounds!

Merry Christmas and Happy New Year! 

Kristi May, MS, CVPM, LVMT, AHT, BS, ABCDT 
White House Animal Hospital 615-672-0357
Like us on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/pethospital/
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Tips for Safe Flea Prevention!

Always read all label information before applying medications to your pet,
and ask yourself these questions:


                Is my pet the right age for this product?
                Many flea medications are not labeled for use in puppies or kittens under 6                             months of age.
      
                Do I have the right species of pet for this medication?
                There can be potentially fatal reactions with some dog flea medications when                         applied to cats or rabbits.
               
                Am I about to apply this in the right way?
                Is this something that you apply to the skin or give by mouth?
 
                Is there a health reason that my pet should not have this medication?
                Always consult with your veterinarian if your pet has any health conditions or is                     pregnant or nursing.


                If you have a cat, talk to your vet to make sure medications you use for your dog                 are safe around your cat.




Never use multiple flea medications on your pet, unless directed to do so by your veterinarian. (Fleas can be a very frustrating problem, and it can be tempting to say that the medication is not working after a day or so and try another product.) While some flea medications work in different ways and can be used together, many are in the same class of medications, and can build up to toxic levels when used together.

Make sure your veterinarian is your primary source for information about flea medications, not the Internet.
Tea tree oil (Melaleuca alternifolia) and garlic (Allium sativum) are commonly recommended online to treat or prevent fleas—but these can cause serious and potentially life-threatening issues. If you want to use alternative flea control or prevention, speak with your vet first to see what they recommend and how to use it most effectively.

Always double-check everything before you apply flea medications to your pet. Many homes have multiple pets and therefore several different flea medications.

If you accidentally get a topical medication in your pet’s eye, first rinse the eye with a sterile eye irrigation solution or room-temperature tap water. Next, contact White House Animal Hospital and the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center for additional steps to take and signs to monitor for.

If your pet licks some of the medication off his or her body, give them a small amount of their food to help relieve the bad taste. Blot the area with a paper towel. Next, contact your veterinarian or the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center for additional steps to take and what to watch for.

If you mistakenly apply a dog flea medication to a cat and the cat starts to have shaking, convulsions or seizures, take them immediately to White House Animal Hospital. These signs may take up to 48 hours to occur. If you realize that you have put a dog flea medication on your cat and they aren’t showing any signs yet, contact White House Animal Hospital and the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center immediately. 

White House Animal Hospital has several options available to you, schedule today by calling 615-672-0357 or online for your Flea/Tick preventive consultation.  Walk out the door with treatment in hand or have it shipped to your door through our Online Pharmacy!




Kristi May, MS, CVPM, LVMT, AHT, BS, ABCDT 
White House Animal Hospital 615-672-0357
Like us on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/pethospital/
Follow us on Twitter at https://twitter.com/WHPetVet
Follow us on Pintrest at https://www.pinterest.com/WHPETVET/

Tips for Safe Flea Prevention!

Always read all label information before applying medications to your pet,
and ask yourself these questions:


                Is my pet the right age for this product?
                Many flea medications are not labeled for use in puppies or kittens under 6                             months of age.
      
                Do I have the right species of pet for this medication?
                There can be potentially fatal reactions with some dog flea medications when                         applied to cats or rabbits.
               
                Am I about to apply this in the right way?
                Is this something that you apply to the skin or give by mouth?
 
                Is there a health reason that my pet should not have this medication?
                Always consult with your veterinarian if your pet has any health conditions or is                     pregnant or nursing.


                If you have a cat, talk to your vet to make sure medications you use for your dog                 are safe around your cat.




Never use multiple flea medications on your pet, unless directed to do so by your veterinarian. (Fleas can be a very frustrating problem, and it can be tempting to say that the medication is not working after a day or so and try another product.) While some flea medications work in different ways and can be used together, many are in the same class of medications, and can build up to toxic levels when used together.

Make sure your veterinarian is your primary source for information about flea medications, not the Internet.
Tea tree oil (Melaleuca alternifolia) and garlic (Allium sativum) are commonly recommended online to treat or prevent fleas—but these can cause serious and potentially life-threatening issues. If you want to use alternative flea control or prevention, speak with your vet first to see what they recommend and how to use it most effectively.

Always double-check everything before you apply flea medications to your pet. Many homes have multiple pets and therefore several different flea medications.

If you accidentally get a topical medication in your pet’s eye, first rinse the eye with a sterile eye irrigation solution or room-temperature tap water. Next, contact White House Animal Hospital and the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center for additional steps to take and signs to monitor for.

If your pet licks some of the medication off his or her body, give them a small amount of their food to help relieve the bad taste. Blot the area with a paper towel. Next, contact your veterinarian or the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center for additional steps to take and what to watch for.

If you mistakenly apply a dog flea medication to a cat and the cat starts to have shaking, convulsions or seizures, take them immediately to White House Animal Hospital. These signs may take up to 48 hours to occur. If you realize that you have put a dog flea medication on your cat and they aren’t showing any signs yet, contact White House Animal Hospital and the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center immediately. 

White House Animal Hospital has several options available to you, schedule today by calling 615-672-0357 or online for your Flea/Tick preventive consultation.  Walk out the door with treatment in hand or have it shipped to your door through our Online Pharmacy!




Kristi May, MS, CVPM, LVMT, AHT, BS, ABCDT 
White House Animal Hospital 615-672-0357
Like us on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/pethospital/
Follow us on Twitter at https://twitter.com/WHPetVet
Follow us on Pintrest at https://www.pinterest.com/WHPETVET/

Tuesday, November 15, 2016

The Best Way to Show Thanks this Season is with an Annual Checkup...

All pets come with special care instructions. Feed daily, love forever and yearly checkups. We know you have the first two covered, but what about the last one? Yearly checkups are equally as important! They are essential to your furry friend’s happiness and well-being. They are the best way to keep your pet healthier, longer!

During our veterinarian’s physical exam, your pet gets checked from tongue to teeth to toes to tail. (Plus all the parts in between!) Our in-depth, medical checkup not only assesses your pet’s current health status, but also helps to prevent future problems, such as obesity, periodontal disease and diabetes. At this time, it also provides us with the opportunity to discuss all the ways to keep your pal in good shape and to answer your questions. We can cover any topic you want in the comfort of our exam room.

Yes, all pets do come with special care instructions:
Feed daily (but not from the Thanksgiving dinner table)
Love forever (you do that the best!)
Yearly checkups (we’re here to ensure your pet stays healthy!)
Stay Safe this Holiday Season! 




We’re grateful for your trust in us to recommend what’s best for your pet. Call us at 615-672-0357 to make an appointment for your pet’s yearly checkup or schedule online today! Your pet will be thankful too.



Happy Thanksgiving from all of us at White House Animal Hospital! 


Kristi May, MS, CVPM, LVMT, AHT, BS, ABCDT 
White House Animal Hospital 615-672-0357
Like us on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/pethospital/
Follow us on Twitter at https://twitter.com/WHPetVet
Follow us on Pintrest at https://www.pinterest.com/WHPETVET/

Tuesday, October 4, 2016

Tick or Treat!




Tick or Treat!


Ticks are alive and well this fall.  

Some ticks can infest dogs that spend most of their time indoors, and even dogs that only spend brief periods of time outside can have ticks.
Ticks attach to your dog by inserting their mouthparts into your dog’s skin.  The places where ticks attach can become red and irritated.
Although rare, ticks can consume enough of your dog’s blood to cause a low blood deficiency called anemia. Certain female ticks can also cause a rare paralysis in dogs as a result of a toxin they produce while feeding. More important, ticks are capable of causing many diseases in your pet such at Lyme disease, Rocky Mountain spotted fever, Anaplasmosis, Heartland Virus, Ehrilichiosis, and Southern Tick-Associated Rash Illness.
Lyme disease can cause arthritis and swelling of your dog’s joints, resulting in painful lameness. Rocky Mountain spotted fever can cause fever, lameness, and other signs. There are also other diseases that ticks can transmit to your dog. 
It is very difficult to prevent your dog’s exposure to ticks. Ticks can attach to your dog when he or she goes with you on walks, hikes, or during any outdoor activities.
The best way to prevent ticks from attaching to your dog is by the regular use of tick control products like Nexgard. Your favorite White House Animal Hospital veterinarian can advise you about the best product for your dog and your situation. Your veterinarian is also aware of diseases that are common in your area and can pose a risk to your dog.  Schedule to get your pets protected today and when you Purchase 6 does of Nexgard you will get 2 doses for free for the Month of October 2016 at White House Animal Hospital. 
Kristi May, MS, CVPM, LVMT, AHT, BS, ABCDT 
White House Animal Hospital 615-672-0357
Like us on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/pethospital/
Follow us on Twitter at https://twitter.com/WHPetVet
Follow us on Pintrest at https://www.pinterest.com/WHPETVET/




October is a great month for animals


It’s National Service Dog Month, National Animal Safety and Protection Month, ASPCA’s Adopt a Shelter Dog Month and there’s even a shout-out to cats this month on National Cat Day, October 29. With all of these warm and fuzzy feelings circulating in the autumn air, it’s a perfect time to take a good, hard look at your pet. How has he/she been acting lately?




Nipping. Scratching. Litter box issues. Leash pulling. Meowing at night. Urinating on the floor. Chewing shoes. Are these behaviors just part of being a “normal” dog or cat, or not?

Some common behavior issues are due to underlying medical problems. These illnesses are tough to recognize even for the most observant owners. For example, if your dog started nipping at the kids, it may be a sign he’s in pain. Your cat may stop jumping on your lap. Not because she’s being unfriendly, but because she has arthritis and it hurts.

If these behaviors are left unchecked, it’s a triple issue. The behavior may worsen, the underlying medical condition may progress (which puts your pet’s health at risk), and most importantly, your pet’s quality of life as part of your family is compromised.


Here’s where we can help. We have the expertise when it comes to analyzing, identifying and resolving behavior issues with your pet. At your pet’s yearly checkup, we can talk about your pet’s behavior and help give your pet a “new leash” on life! We are committed to your pet’s well-being…all the way! Schedule your pet’s yearly checkup today http://www.whitehousevet.com/contactus.html!



Kristi May, MS, CVPM, LVMT, AHT, BS, ABCDT 
White House Animal Hospital 615-672-0357
Like us on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/pethospital/
Follow us on Twitter at https://twitter.com/WHPetVet
Follow us on Pintrest at https://www.pinterest.com/WHPETVET/


Tuesday, August 23, 2016

Microchip Pay if Forward!

Pay it Forward Chip Donation at White House Animal Hospital is in full swing! Wellness Rewards members that already have their pets microchipped are donating their free microchip! Nominate a pet to be the recipient of the microchip in the comments below the posts on our Facebook page https://www.facebook.com/pethospital, the comment with the most likes 48 hours from the time of the post will receive a free microchip!

Pay if Forward came out the +White House Animal Hospital August Microchip promotion!  FREE Microchip for the Month of August ($50 Value) at White House Animal Hospital with a new or renewed Pet Wellness Rewards Membership (http://www.whitehousevet.com/membershiprewards.html) or $10 with any exam for Non-Pet Wellenss Rewards Members. For More Information and scheduleing please visit http://www.whitehousevet.com/contactus.html and to see how microchips can save your pets life!  Wellness rewards members that already have their pets microchipped have opted to donate their microchip!



For more information please visit our Facebook Page at https://www.facebook.com/pethospital

Kristi May, MS, CVPM, LVMT, AHT, BS, ABCDT 
White House Animal Hospital 615-672-0357
Like us on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/pethospital/
Follow us on Twitter at https://twitter.com/WHPetVet
Follow us on Pintrest at https://www.pinterest.com/WHPETVET/


Monday, August 15, 2016

National Check the Chip Day!



August 15: Today is National Check the Chip Day! Stop by White House Animal Hospital from 8am-5pm to have your pet scanned to ensure your chip is working! Need a Chip? White House Animal Hospital is offering Free Microchipping for the Month of August!



FREE Microchip for the Month of August ($50 Value) at White House Animal Hospital with a new or renewed Pet Wellness Rewards Membership (http://www.whitehousevet.com/membershiprewards.html) or $10 with any exam for Non-Pet Wellenss Rewards Members. For More Information and scheduling please visit http://www.whitehousevet.com/contactus.html

Kristi May, MS, CVPM, LVMT, AHT, BS, ABCDT 
White House Animal Hospital 615-672-0357
Like us on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/pethospital/
Follow us on Twitter at https://twitter.com/WHPetVet
Follow us on Pintrest at https://www.pinterest.com/WHPETVET/

Tuesday, July 19, 2016

How can you tell if your pet’s heart is pumping right?

How can you tell if your pet’s heart is pumping right?
Schedule your pet’s annual checkup today and let’s take a listen!



When you’re a pet owner, you know a lot about the health of your pet just by using your senses. You can see your pet’s eyes when they’re goopy. You can smell their ear infection a mile away. You can feel the lumps and bumps on their skin. But what about their heart? How do you know if that organ is healthy?

Heart disease affects pets of all ages. For example, certain breeds of dogs and cats are at a higher risk of heart disease at a young age. Others develop heart conditions later in life, when another illness crops up. Some pets develop heart disease at any age without noticeable signs. Yes, their heart may not be pumping right even though their tails are wagging and purring is at an all-time high!

If your pet’s heart is not checked regularly, your pet may be at risk for heart disease and in some cases, a shortened lifespan. The good news is, if caught early, most issues can be treated or managed successfully for years. And if your pet already has a heart condition but is regularly monitored by our practice, often we can slow its progression.

Schedule your pet’s yearly checkup. During the exam, we’ll take a listen to make sure your pet’s heart sounds right. We’ll also perform a few other easy tests if needed to keep your pet’s ticker in the best shape possible!

When we think of love, we think of hearts. And we love your pet. It’s why we do what we do. Make an appointment today by calling 615-672-0357!

Kristi May, MS, CVPM, LVMT, AHT, BS, ABCDT 
White House Animal Hospital 615-672-0357
Like us on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/pethospital/
Follow us on Twitter at https://twitter.com/WHPetVet
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Tuesday, June 28, 2016

Pets and Fireworks Don't Mix!


Fireworks, picnics and other Fourth of July traditions can be great fun for people; but all of the festivities can be frightening and even dangerous for animals. Noisy fireworks and other celebrations can startle animals and cause them to run away; holiday foods can be unhealthy; summer heat and travel can be dangerous; and potentially dangerous debris can end up lying on the ground where pets can eat or play with it.
Whether or not you’re planning your own Independence Day celebration, it’s important to take precautions to keep your pets safe both during and after the July 4th festivities.

Preparing in advance:

  • Make sure your pets – cats and dogs alike – have identification tags with up-to-date information. If you have horses, you might consider writing your contact information on your horses hoof during this stressful time.
  • If your pets aren’t already microchipped, shchedule your pet for a Microchip Today. This simple procedure can greatly improve your chances of getting your pets back if they become lost.
  • If your pets are microchipped, make sure your contact information in the microchip registry is up-to-date.
  • Take a current photo of all of your cats, dogs and horses – just in case.
  • If your pet has historically been anxious on this holiday, or if you have reason to expect potentially harmful reactions, consider behavioral therapy to desensitize your pet and reduce the risk of problems. Some pets may need medication. Consult your veterinarian or behaviorist at White House Animal Hospital!
  • Make sure the environment is safe and secure. If your neighbors set off fireworks at an unexpected time, is your yard secure enough to keep your pet contained? Are pasture fences secure enough to keep horses or other livestock confined? Evaluate your options, and choose the safest area for your animals; and make improvements if needed to make the area more secure.

Safety during July 4th celebrations:

  • Leave your pets at home when you go to parties, fireworks displays, parades and other gatherings. Loud fireworks, unfamiliar places and crowds can all be very frightening to pets, and there’s great risk of pets becoming spooked and running away.
  • Consider putting your pets in a safe, escape-proof room or crate during parties and fireworks.
  • Keep horses and livestock in safely fenced areas and as far from the excitement and noise as possible.
  • If you’re hosting guests, ask them to help keep an eye on your pets to make sure they don’t escape. Placing notes on exit doors and gates can help both you and your guests remain vigilant.
  • Keep your pets inside if you or your neighbors are setting off fireworks.
  • Keep sparklers, glow sticks, fireworks, charcoal and kabob skewers away from curious pets.
  • Don’t let pets get near your barbecue grill while it is in use or still hot.
  • Avoid the urge to feed your pets table scraps or other foods intended for people. Be especially careful to keep them away from these common foods that are actually toxic.
  • Remember that too much sun and heat (and humidity!) can be dangerous to pets. Keep them inside when it’s extremely hot/humid; make sure they have access to shady spots and plenty of water when outdoors; don’t leave them outside for extended periods in hot weather; and know the signs of heat Stroke.
  • Never leave your pet in your car when it’s warm outside. Vehicle interiors heat up much faster than the air around them, and even a short time in a locked car can be dangerous to pets.
  • If you’re travelling out of town for the holiday, consider leaving your pets at home with a pet sitter or boarding them in a kennel. If you need to bring them with you, be sure you know how to keep them safe.
  • Follow safe food handling and hygiene practices to protect your family and guests.

After the celebrations:

  • Check your yard for fireworks debris before allowing pets outside to play or relax. Even if you didn’t set off fireworks yourself, debris can make its way into your yard, where curious animals may pick it up to play with or eat.
  • Check your pastures and remove debris to protect horses and livestock.
  • If you hosted guests, check both your yard and home for food scraps or other debris that might be dangerous to pets, such as food skewers.
If you suspect your pet may have suffered a heat stroke, ingested a foreign object, or is having severe anxiety call White House Animal Hospital for help.  Call 615-672-0357 to get your pet in immediately

Kristi May, MS, CVPM, LVMT, AHT, BS, ABCDT 
White House Animal Hospital 615-672-0357
Like us on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/pethospital/
Follow us on Twitter at https://twitter.com/WHPetVet
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Thursday, June 9, 2016

Heat Stroke in Pets a Medical Emergency!


When an animal is in a situation where it becomes overheated it is vital that it receive immediate medical intervention. 

Signs of Heat Stroke in Pets

  • Breathing difficulties as shown through:
    • Rapid breathing that appears frantic, noisy
    • Heavy panting
  • Tongue and mucous membranes will appear bright red
  • Saliva is thick and tenacious
  • Animal will often vomit
  • Taking a rectal temperature may confirm the diagnosis of heat stroke:
    • Normal temperature <102.5°
When left untreated, further heat stroke symptoms may show in ways such as:
  • Animal will appear unsteady and will stagger
  • Bloody diarrhea may occur
  • Lips and mucous membranes will change from bright red to pale blue or gray
  • Animal will:
    • Collapse
    • Have seizures
    • Fall into a coma
    • Die

Treatment for Heat Stroke in Animals

Pets suffering from heat stroke require immediate care. The longer an animal goes without treatment, the greater the chances are for the animal to suffer irreversible damage. Treating the animal requires:
  • Cooling its body down towards a normal temperature:
    • Move the animal out from the source of the heat
  • Using a rectal thermometer, begin monitoring the animal’s temperature every 10 minutes
  • In more severe cases, the following procedures may be taken:
    • Begin rapidly cooling the animal through methods such as:
      • Wetting the animal down with a hose
      • Immersing animal up to its neck in a tub of cool water, not ice water, for about 2 minutes
      • Placing wet animal in front of an electric fan
      • Applying cool packs or wet, cold towels to the armpits, groin, and on head
      • Wiping the paws and pads with cool water
    • Continue monitoring the rectal temperature until the temperature has lowered:
    • For both dogs and cats: temperature under 103° F
  • Once the animal’s temperature has been lowered, it is important to stop the cooling process and dry the animal off
    • Continuing with the cooling process after the temperature has been lowered may produce hypothermia and shock
Immediately bring pets in to see the veterinarian following an episode of heat stroke. Animals can experience delayed and secondary complications that occur within hours or up to days later, for example:
  • Kidney failure
  • Cardiac arrhythmias
  • Seizures
  • Laryngeal edema
  • Spontaneous bleeding
If you suspect your pet may have suffered a heat stroke, take immediate steps to reduce the body temperature and call White House Animal Hospital for help.  Call 615-672-0357 to get your pet in immediately

Kristi May, MS, CVPM, LVMT, AHT, BS, ABCDT 
White House Animal Hospital 615-672-0357
Like us on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/pethospital/
Follow us on Twitter at https://twitter.com/WHPetVet
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Sources:

Dog Owner’s Home Veterinary Handbook, 4th ed., D.M. Eldredge, L.D. Carlson, D.G. Carlson, J.M. Giffin
Cat Owner’s Home Veterinary Handbook, 3rd ed., D.M. Eldredge, D.G. Carlson, L.D. Carlson, J.M. Giffin